Revisiting Proto-Personas for Executive Alignment

See on Scoop.it - UXploration

Design is an iterative progress, ideas might seem good on the surface but they can always be made simpler, better, and more effective. This collaborative exercise sets a great precedent for the rest of our engagement as we will present and iterate many more times as we design and develop meaningful experiences for our users that also perform for our clients.


See on uxmag.com

#UXTOKYO JAM 2014 セッション紹介:Empathy in UX Design #UXTOKYOA

uxbctokyo:

Empathy in UX Design

突然ですが、「Empathy(エンパシー)」という言葉を聞いたことがあるでしょうか?共感や感情移入、と訳されますが、UX デザインを組織の中に浸透させていくためには、ユーザーのみならず、プロジェクトメンバーへの共感、更には事業戦略や組織戦略への共感まで視野に入れることが求められています。そのためには、「ブリッジビルダー」としての役割が欠かせません。我々が他者と差別化できる要素こそ、このエンパシーなのです。

#UXTOKYO JAM 2014 セッション紹介:UXデザインのためのマテリアリズム #UXTOKYOB

uxbctokyo:

UXデザインのためのマテリアリズム

UXデザインという言葉が普及し始め、数年が経ちました。UXというのは、ユーザーの身体に蓄積される「経験」のことです。

ユーザーの身体は物理空間に存在しているものであり、また、私たちが制作するウェブサービスの利用もまた物理空間にて行われるものです。

しかし、ウェブ制作者はなかなかウェブから脱出することができません。情報空間に捉われ、本当に重要である物理空間のことを忘れかけているように思います。身体的制約が物理空間にある限り、脱・ウェブをしないことには、真のユーザーエクスペリエンスのデザインは不可能ではないでしょうか。

なぜAirbnbはグローバルに "Belong Anywhere" と宣言しつつ、日本人にだけ「暮らすように旅しよう」と言っているのか

ishibashi:

Airbnbのリブランディングが話題になっています。

これについて、どうしても気になることがあります。Airbnbのブランディングって、日本だけ「別物扱い」なんじゃないかと。新しい “Belong Anywhere” というブランドコンセプトについての記事には中文版・ハングル版があるのに、日本語版は用意されていません。そして日本向けのキャッチコピーは従来通り「暮らすように旅をしよう」のままで、変更されていません。

暮らすように旅をしよう。特別な休暇があなたを待っている。 – Airbnb
※とあるウェブサイトに掲載されていたAirbnbのバナー広告

「暮らすように旅をしよう」と “Belong Anywhere”…

#UXTokyo Jam 2014 セッション紹介:UXから「生きたUX」へ ー 論から「実践UX」へSHIFTしよう #UXTokyoA

uxbctokyo:

UXから「生きたUX」へ ー 論から「実践UX」へSHIFTしよう

UXというのは、「ユーザーエクスペリエンス(ユーザー体験)」の略です。主にWEB制作現場やアプリなどUI(ユーザーインターフェース)などで、ユーザーを思考するという観点から、サイト制作などにも取り入れられています。

なぜ、私が呼ばれている?^^; はて。。なんで?

と思うかもしれませんね。

Designという分野では、私はもともと1996年からWebデザイナーとして企業のサイト制作に携わってきています。

かれこれ、実績としては200社くらいのサイトを手がけてきています。

firsttimeux:

Android Wear / Gear Live first time user experience
The above images represent the setup experience for a Gear Live Android Wear smart watch. 
The good bits:
The phone drives much of the device setup so that the user does not have to read instructions on the watch screen. This proves particularly helpful with the Gear Live, because its screen kept going to sleep every 3 seconds. Although not necessary to reference, the printed device manual also repeats many of the setup instructions.
There is no intro tour on the phone. There is only a “Make your watch smart” screen, after which a user is immediately taken to the setup flow.
In the case of this particular watch, pairing was successful on the first try. However, based on experiences with past devices, it is possible that there could be issues with bluetooth pairing during the initial setup.
The watch provides a user-guided tutorial with embedded free samples to demonstrate Android Wear functionality. This is helpful because the watch does not have a lot of space to provide help text, and gives users without any notifications lined up something to play with. The tutorial appears immediately after pairing and takes the user through a few typical card behaviors. Confirmations and prompts move at the user’s pace. The messaging in each step is casual and progressive, moving from phrases like “Easy, right?” to “Keep swiping” to “And again for actions” and finally “Got it.”  Now, since I did not have notifications in queue at the time I was using the tutorial, I am not certain whether I would have been forced to finish it before interacting with a true notification.
Additionally, the user can manually trigger and explore free sample cards via the phone app. The user can pick one of many sample cards to be sent to the watch for further exploration. This helps build a user’s knowledge about different card types and gives him something to enjoy if he doesn’t yet have his own content, but doesn’t force him to go through each and every one.
To be improved:
The watch forces the user to pair with a phone before it provides any functionality. It won’t even display the time. That the “watch” couldn’t even show the time until paired was a disappointment for me because I initially didn’t have a phone that could run Android Wear (which I did not discover until trying to install it). 
There is a double confirmation for access to user data.  There was a prompt when downloading the Android Wear app from the Play Store, and a prompt on the phone’s “Make your watch smart” screen. I’m not clear what would have happened had I selected “No thanks” on the latter. 
The “Make your watch smart” screen is overly verbose with hard-to-read text paragraphs, which confuses its purpose. Is the goal of this screen to explain what user data will be shared (as per the prompt at the bottom) or to illustrate key features? I’d recommend this screen be revisited to shorten and focus these paragraphs.
While the initial device pairing was painless, my watch did randomly restart and begin updating its software without first informing me. It even failed partway through and rebooted into recovery mode. If this needs to happen after pairing, it should be communicated before the update starts (especially to give the user the opportunity to charge his watch). 
The printed setup manual showed screenshots from Android Wear that no longer seemed relevant to the current software.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • iPhone 5s
  • 64
  • f/2.2
  • 1/30th
  • 4mm
firsttimeux:

Android Wear / Gear Live first time user experience
The above images represent the setup experience for a Gear Live Android Wear smart watch. 
The good bits:
The phone drives much of the device setup so that the user does not have to read instructions on the watch screen. This proves particularly helpful with the Gear Live, because its screen kept going to sleep every 3 seconds. Although not necessary to reference, the printed device manual also repeats many of the setup instructions.
There is no intro tour on the phone. There is only a “Make your watch smart” screen, after which a user is immediately taken to the setup flow.
In the case of this particular watch, pairing was successful on the first try. However, based on experiences with past devices, it is possible that there could be issues with bluetooth pairing during the initial setup.
The watch provides a user-guided tutorial with embedded free samples to demonstrate Android Wear functionality. This is helpful because the watch does not have a lot of space to provide help text, and gives users without any notifications lined up something to play with. The tutorial appears immediately after pairing and takes the user through a few typical card behaviors. Confirmations and prompts move at the user’s pace. The messaging in each step is casual and progressive, moving from phrases like “Easy, right?” to “Keep swiping” to “And again for actions” and finally “Got it.”  Now, since I did not have notifications in queue at the time I was using the tutorial, I am not certain whether I would have been forced to finish it before interacting with a true notification.
Additionally, the user can manually trigger and explore free sample cards via the phone app. The user can pick one of many sample cards to be sent to the watch for further exploration. This helps build a user’s knowledge about different card types and gives him something to enjoy if he doesn’t yet have his own content, but doesn’t force him to go through each and every one.
To be improved:
The watch forces the user to pair with a phone before it provides any functionality. It won’t even display the time. That the “watch” couldn’t even show the time until paired was a disappointment for me because I initially didn’t have a phone that could run Android Wear (which I did not discover until trying to install it). 
There is a double confirmation for access to user data.  There was a prompt when downloading the Android Wear app from the Play Store, and a prompt on the phone’s “Make your watch smart” screen. I’m not clear what would have happened had I selected “No thanks” on the latter. 
The “Make your watch smart” screen is overly verbose with hard-to-read text paragraphs, which confuses its purpose. Is the goal of this screen to explain what user data will be shared (as per the prompt at the bottom) or to illustrate key features? I’d recommend this screen be revisited to shorten and focus these paragraphs.
While the initial device pairing was painless, my watch did randomly restart and begin updating its software without first informing me. It even failed partway through and rebooted into recovery mode. If this needs to happen after pairing, it should be communicated before the update starts (especially to give the user the opportunity to charge his watch). 
The printed setup manual showed screenshots from Android Wear that no longer seemed relevant to the current software.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • iPhone 5s
  • 125
  • f/2.2
  • 1/30th
  • 4mm
firsttimeux:

Android Wear / Gear Live first time user experience
The above images represent the setup experience for a Gear Live Android Wear smart watch. 
The good bits:
The phone drives much of the device setup so that the user does not have to read instructions on the watch screen. This proves particularly helpful with the Gear Live, because its screen kept going to sleep every 3 seconds. Although not necessary to reference, the printed device manual also repeats many of the setup instructions.
There is no intro tour on the phone. There is only a “Make your watch smart” screen, after which a user is immediately taken to the setup flow.
In the case of this particular watch, pairing was successful on the first try. However, based on experiences with past devices, it is possible that there could be issues with bluetooth pairing during the initial setup.
The watch provides a user-guided tutorial with embedded free samples to demonstrate Android Wear functionality. This is helpful because the watch does not have a lot of space to provide help text, and gives users without any notifications lined up something to play with. The tutorial appears immediately after pairing and takes the user through a few typical card behaviors. Confirmations and prompts move at the user’s pace. The messaging in each step is casual and progressive, moving from phrases like “Easy, right?” to “Keep swiping” to “And again for actions” and finally “Got it.”  Now, since I did not have notifications in queue at the time I was using the tutorial, I am not certain whether I would have been forced to finish it before interacting with a true notification.
Additionally, the user can manually trigger and explore free sample cards via the phone app. The user can pick one of many sample cards to be sent to the watch for further exploration. This helps build a user’s knowledge about different card types and gives him something to enjoy if he doesn’t yet have his own content, but doesn’t force him to go through each and every one.
To be improved:
The watch forces the user to pair with a phone before it provides any functionality. It won’t even display the time. That the “watch” couldn’t even show the time until paired was a disappointment for me because I initially didn’t have a phone that could run Android Wear (which I did not discover until trying to install it). 
There is a double confirmation for access to user data.  There was a prompt when downloading the Android Wear app from the Play Store, and a prompt on the phone’s “Make your watch smart” screen. I’m not clear what would have happened had I selected “No thanks” on the latter. 
The “Make your watch smart” screen is overly verbose with hard-to-read text paragraphs, which confuses its purpose. Is the goal of this screen to explain what user data will be shared (as per the prompt at the bottom) or to illustrate key features? I’d recommend this screen be revisited to shorten and focus these paragraphs.
While the initial device pairing was painless, my watch did randomly restart and begin updating its software without first informing me. It even failed partway through and rebooted into recovery mode. If this needs to happen after pairing, it should be communicated before the update starts (especially to give the user the opportunity to charge his watch). 
The printed setup manual showed screenshots from Android Wear that no longer seemed relevant to the current software.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • Aperture
  • Focal Length
  • Samsung SM-G900H
  • f/2.2
  • 4mm

firsttimeux:

Android Wear / Gear Live first time user experience

The above images represent the setup experience for a Gear Live Android Wear smart watch. 

The good bits:

  • The phone drives much of the device setup so that the user does not have to read instructions on the watch screen. This proves particularly helpful with the Gear Live, because its screen kept going to sleep every 3 seconds. Although not necessary to reference, the printed device manual also repeats many of the setup instructions.
  • There is no intro tour on the phone. There is only a “Make your watch smart” screen, after which a user is immediately taken to the setup flow.
  • In the case of this particular watch, pairing was successful on the first try. However, based on experiences with past devices, it is possible that there could be issues with bluetooth pairing during the initial setup.
  • The watch provides a user-guided tutorial with embedded free samples to demonstrate Android Wear functionality. This is helpful because the watch does not have a lot of space to provide help text, and gives users without any notifications lined up something to play with. The tutorial appears immediately after pairing and takes the user through a few typical card behaviors. Confirmations and prompts move at the user’s pace. The messaging in each step is casual and progressive, moving from phrases like “Easy, right?” to “Keep swiping” to “And again for actions” and finally “Got it.”  Now, since I did not have notifications in queue at the time I was using the tutorial, I am not certain whether I would have been forced to finish it before interacting with a true notification.
  • Additionally, the user can manually trigger and explore free sample cards via the phone app. The user can pick one of many sample cards to be sent to the watch for further exploration. This helps build a user’s knowledge about different card types and gives him something to enjoy if he doesn’t yet have his own content, but doesn’t force him to go through each and every one.

To be improved:

  • The watch forces the user to pair with a phone before it provides any functionality. It won’t even display the time. That the “watch” couldn’t even show the time until paired was a disappointment for me because I initially didn’t have a phone that could run Android Wear (which I did not discover until trying to install it). 
  • There is a double confirmation for access to user data.  There was a prompt when downloading the Android Wear app from the Play Store, and a prompt on the phone’s “Make your watch smart” screen. I’m not clear what would have happened had I selected “No thanks” on the latter. 
  • The “Make your watch smart” screen is overly verbose with hard-to-read text paragraphs, which confuses its purpose. Is the goal of this screen to explain what user data will be shared (as per the prompt at the bottom) or to illustrate key features? I’d recommend this screen be revisited to shorten and focus these paragraphs.
  • While the initial device pairing was painless, my watch did randomly restart and begin updating its software without first informing me. It even failed partway through and rebooted into recovery mode. If this needs to happen after pairing, it should be communicated before the update starts (especially to give the user the opportunity to charge his watch). 
  • The printed setup manual showed screenshots from Android Wear that no longer seemed relevant to the current software.