To approach a Service Design project you need to think holistically, think systemically, and think about the end-to-end flow as PEOPLE move through the service (on both sides of the counter). And you need to look under the bonnet at the processes, systems and infrastructure required in order to deliver on that service.

If you have a hammer… the UX perspective on Service Design

We don’t make films to make money, we make money to make more films.

Walt Disney

firsttimeux:

Waze for Android first time user experience

The good bits:

  • For folks familiar with past versions of Waze, the app’s new first run experience has much improved. It used to be that new users needed to watch a video/swipe through an animated intro tour before they could access the map. But now, the new user gets quickly placed into map mode. The videos and feature content are still there, but accessible instead through an introductory message from the map and through it’s help/about section. 
  • The app provides modeless, inline tips for users to read at the bottom of the map screen, instead of interrupting them with modal popovers or an intro tour.

To be improved:

  • As first impressions go, the new user may be put off by the 2 “messy” screens seen on first run. Aside from the sometimes-unpredictable manual location selector (I triggered this despite having location services turned on), the required end user license agreement can come across as especially daunting. The EULA not only raises questions early on about privacy, but gets in the way of that quick entry into map mode. 
  • The introduction to the user’s avatar on first launch via the “Meet your Wazer” popup may be unnecessary, and can certainly be confusing. This is because it appears out of context from what the new user sees next. When she enters the map for the first time, this pink Wazer icon is not shown. Instead, the new user is represented as a blue arrow. There’s no clear link between that “Meet your Wazer” dialog and the user’s actual avatar. The dialog seems to suffer a problem that also plagues intro tours: describing features that are not yet relevant to the new user, which can ultimately confuse instead of inspire.

The Next UX Revolution: Transforming Stodgy Enterprise Applications Into Engaging Experiences

See on Scoop.it - UXploration

As consumer UX underwent a renaissance over the last decade, enterprise software stagnated with a design sensibility from the dial-up era.

Usability—much less beauty—was never a priority for business software. All that mattered was that large and complex applications worked. What’s the point of tweaking and beautifying when basic functionality is challenging enough and all of your competitors are equally sub par?

The point is users. Not yesterday’s users who eventually adapted to whatever complex software product you put in front of them. Those users are retiring. I’m talking about millennial workers who know better than to settle for unwieldy, confusing applications that only make their jobs harder.


See on uxmag.com

Service Blueprints: Laying the Foundation

See on Scoop.it - UXploration

You may be familiar with customer journey mapping, which is a tool that allows stakeholders to better understand customer interactions with their product or service over time. The service blueprint contains the customer journey as well as all of the interactions that make that journey possible.

Because of this, service blueprints can be used to better deliver a successful customer experience. Think of it this way: you can look at a building, and you can read a description, but to build the building you need more than an image or description. You need the instructions – the blueprint.


See on cooper.com
Digital Natives are Constantly Multitasking
When we add up all the online activities in the “average” day of a Digital Native it results in 27 hours! They often have multiple screens open and a number of programs running simultaneously, dividing their attention and distracting them. All this multi-tasking can take its toll.

Digital Natives are Constantly Multitasking

When we add up all the online activities in the “average” day of a Digital Native it results in 27 hours! They often have multiple screens open and a number of programs running simultaneously, dividing their attention and distracting them. All this multi-tasking can take its toll.

Design (Fucking) Thing

Design (Fucking) Thing